About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
on this. so now we are bringing this to the public. we will find a time for secretary napolitano to come before the committee. i hope this will give the public an opportunity to learn about it. unlessly every one of us we say we don't know how to read, everyone of us will have plenty of time to analyze this bill before we actually start marking it up in may. just a member, immigration has been an ongoing source of renewal of our spirit and creativity -- remember, immigration has been an ongoing source of renewal of ours are it and creativity. spirit and creativity. innovation for our companies. our nation continues to benefit from immigrants. we need to uphold the fundamental values of family and hard or can. -- work. foreign agricultural workers ofport vermont growers, many whom move into the fabric of vermont's agricultural community. of us.stem affects all now is our time to fix it. act to liberally. but we have to act. we can talk about it, but eventually we have to vote. millions of people are depending on us. editor grassley -- senator grassley? >> we feel that the secretary is doi
in arizona, where secretary napolitano, senator mccaul nd congresswoman joined me, i've been and heard from local mayors, from business leaders from front line officers, i've heard them say they need more help at our ports of entry. especially our ports of entry. i hear the same comments when i visit in texas later this month, i think april 30 and may 1. i want to say to my colleagues, for anyone who is interested in, a day and a half, going down to the boarder in texas, the late afternoon, april 30, and all day on may 1. that i welcome you to join us. i believe that if something's worth having, it's worth paying for. and it's worth it to americans to better facilitate trave trade and travel at our ports of entry, we need to pay for it. that's why i degree with the president's proposal to use modest increases to pay for more customs and border patrol officers. these efforts will build on the tremendous progress we've made in scuring the border over the past decade. i look forward to reviewing the immigration bill introduced this morning. think at 1:45 by senator mccain and senators durbin a
comments at 2:00 eastern on c-span3. earlier today homeland secure the secretary janet napolitano testified on capitol hill. she was talking about the 2014 budget request for our department. she discussed the west texas oil refinery explosion and the boston marathon bombs. here's a look. >> i'll begin with west texas as the more recent event and give you the most current information that we have about the explosion. and, of course, our sympathies and concerns go out to the families of those who've lost loved ones or who have had a loved one who has been injured. as of right now the faa has issued a temporary flight restriction over the area. the texas commission on environmental quality is providing air monitoring and technical assistance. texas task force one has been alerted to provide structural collapse support. the union pacific railroad has halted freight service. and local authorities have turned off utility service in the area including gas and electricity. there is an incident command center at a triage center, but they been recently moved due to fears that additional tanks could b
napolitano, director of f.b.i., you have the head of -- director of the n.s.a., alexander, and all three have said, they said one of the biggest fears they have now are these attacks and that unless we have a sharing opportunity between government and between business they feel they cannot protect our country from these cyberattacks the way we should. it's important we act now on this bill. now, we can pass bills in the house all day long, but if the senate doesn't pass a bill and the president doesn't sign it, where are we? we were able to pass our bill last year in a bipartisan manner, and yet our bill went to the senate and it stalled. the bill didn't go anywhere. so chairman rogers and i started again, but what we said to each other and we discussed was that we need to address the issue of privacy because even though we felt strongly that our bill does protect privacy, we knew there was -- there were groups out there, especially the privacy groups, felt there was not enough protection in our bill. we rolled up our sleeves. we listened to the issues raised by the privacy groups. the admini
security secretary janet napolitano. >> based on the evidence at this point, is there any difference between sandy hook and boston, other than the choice of weapons? in terms of intent for death and destruction and injury, no. methodology, guess. we don't know the motivation certainly behind boston. we don't know whether was domestic, international -- >> or if it was identical to the motivation in sandy hook. >> we just don't know the answer. i think it is impossible for me to sit at the table today and say they are identical, except in the effect of impact. >> as i look at the evidence that is available, you have mass destruction and violence and andghter of innocents, neither case do we note motive. the irony is, we are so quick to call boston terror, why are we not calling the man with a high- capacity assault weapon and a high-capacity magazine, why are we not calling him a terrorist? >> i don't know the answer to that question. host: bill braniff, do you have a response to that exchange? ofst: the definition terrorism is an often repeated question. it comes up and all kinds of c
rights. here to explain is fox news judge andrew napolitano. he was finally read his miranda rights. you have to do that within 48 hours? >> theoretically miranda rights should be read immediately as soon as the person is in custody, before you ask him any questions. we don't know exactly what's happened, we'll find out, but the government told us it did not read him his miranda rights, interrogated him for intelligence, not law enforcement purposes. this is highly controversial and could affect the government's case. but at some point in that interrogation which only lasted a few hours, which apparently consisted of him writing answers because he can't speak due to the injury to his throat. at some point in that interrogation, agents, professional interrogators decided we're not going to get anywhere or we've already learned everything we can learn from him. they also have on their shoulder, breathing down their neck, so to speak, a federal rule of procedure which requires he be charged with something within 48 hours. otherwise they have to let him go. they did charge him with this comp
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6